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Dodecahedron Research Projects

What in the world is a dodecahedron?


I have to admit, these twelve-sided shapes have become one of the highlights of my curriculum!

A dodecahedron is a twelve-sided, 3-D shape that displays all of the the learning we have done with our huge research project in third grade: Colorado Animals.

We have done all sorts of other things in the past (see a few ideas HERE), but this has become the project that continues to make such a huge impact year after year.

Not only does this display a wide variety of learning, the assembly and construction are so much fun!

I have had siblings of former students so excited to make them since they have seen their older brother's or sister's hanging in their room for years.

Filling Out A Dodecahedron

The idea is simple, but does require some planning and a lot of cardstock!

You will need twelve different pages to make your final project. We use my Animal Research Dodecahedron (found on TpT HERE), and I make a mix of lined and blank pages, along with a title page, an About the Author page, and some graphic organizers.


We are pretty explicit as we go through each page. I will pass them out one at a time as we go through our research.

The lined pages are reserved for nonfiction paragraphs that students write from their bullet pointed notes gathered from research.

The blank pages are filled with illustrations to highlight key information or additional information not found in the paragraphs.

We always begin with the title page and About the Author since those don't require much research and can ease the students into the concept of these pages.

Every dodecahedron side has tabs that will need to be colored to really make the project pop. At the end, these tabs will be folded outward, glued and stapled, to create the 3-D shape for display.


As the students create these pages, they cut out the circles and keep all twelve in their folders until it's time to assemble.

Assembling The Dodecahedron


Assembly Day is always so much fun!


I have students make two piles of six pages each. They will be making "flower" shapes with these pages, so they will need to fold all of the tabs towards them before they start.

They will decide on a "center" page and glue the rest of the five pages to each of the center's tabs. They will then go back and staple each tab together. The extra reinforcement will pay off, trust me!

With the other stack of six circles, they will repeat the same process so that they have two "flowers" ready to go.


Once they have these flowers, they can typically see how the dodecahedrons will come together. We next make "hats" or "bowls"-- up to you-- by gluing the nearby tabs together, making a half sphere with each flower.

After gluing and stapling these sides, you will attach the spheres together and voila!


Hole punch a tab and tie some string to it so you can hang these in your classroom. They always get rave reviews from other students, teachers, and parents!

. . . 



I currently have several Dodecahedron Research Projects, including Animal Research, U.S. Presidents, and 50 States, in my TpT Store. I am working on adding more throughout the next few weeks, so be sure to follow my store for the latest updates.

Happy researching!


Classroom Organizing Challenge: February, Week 2: Teacher Desk {Piles & Files}


Welcome to the second month of my Classroom Organizing Challenge!

Each month this year to a specific part of our classroom to get rid of clutter, organize, streamline, and make our classrooms more stress-free!

Below are the list of topics and months, so you can join in and/or catch up anytime.

If you haven't read the Getting Started post, I recommend reading that first for some simple tips, a fun playlist, and a big-picture view of 2019.

You can always catch up on the Classroom Organizing Challenge Page HERE. Here's our yearlong overview:


Getting Started
January: Student Desks
February: Teacher Desk
March: Visible Storage
April: Hidden Storage
May: Technology/Digital
June: Classroom Library
July: Student Life
August: Class Routines
September: Teacher Life
October: Home-School Link
November: Mom Life
December: Maintenance

. . .

Piles & Files

This is a big one: How do you keep paperwork organized in your classroom?

Class List Slip Freebie to Stay Organized


I have posted about my love of student numbers in the past HERE, and mentioned these class list slips there, but wanted to offer up my template today to anyone who may be looking for it. I have received a few requests over time and finally made it into a user-friendly PowerPoint file.

Five Ways to Randomly Call on Students

How do you call on students in your classroom?

I think our natural default as teachers is to call on the student with his/her hand up. It's quick, easy, and keeps the lesson going.

What it eliminates, though, are the students who may need the lesson the most. Among others, they could be the students who are still working through their understanding, the ones who may be checking out since they know others will handle the answers, and those who may need a bit more wait time before they are able to answer.

Classroom Organizing Challenge: February, Week 1: Teacher Desk {Zones}


Welcome to the second month of my Classroom Organizing Challenge!

Each month this year to a specific part of our classroom to get rid of clutter, organize, streamline, and make our classrooms more stress-free!

Below are the list of topics and months, so you can join in and/or catch up anytime.

If you haven't read the Getting Started post, I recommend reading that first for some simple tips, a fun playlist, and a big-picture view of 2019.

You can always catch up on the Classroom Organizing Challenge Page HERE. Here's our yearlong overview:


Getting Started
January: Student Desks
February: Teacher Desk
March: Visible Storage
April: Hidden Storage
May: Technology/Digital
June: Classroom Library
July: Student Life
August: Class Routines
September: Teacher Life
October: Home-School Link
November: Mom Life
December: Maintenance

. . .

Teacher Desk/Work Area

Last month, we tackled student desks and this month, it's our turn!

Board Game Review: Skyjo

For Christmas this year, I bought my daughter quite a few new board games. There are so many exciting and interesting ones out there, I knew it would turn into a fun adventure for us.

Plus, she's seven, so just the right age for many of these games and a great way to see if they will work for third graders.


While playing, I realized that so many of these would be a great addition to a classroom!

Classroom Organizing Challenge: January, Week 4: Student Desks {Bins & Cubbies}


If you are new to this monthly challenge, welcome!

There is a new focus each month and we're starting small with student desks/work spaces and growing from there.

Be sure to go back and reread the work we've already done so you're all caught up.

You can always catch up on the Classroom Organizing Challenge Page HERE. Here's our yearlong overview:

Getting Started
January: Student Desks
February: Teacher Desk
March: Visible Storage
April: Hidden Storage
May: Technology/Digital
June: Classroom Library
July: Student Life
August: Class Routines
September: Teacher Life
October: Home-School Link
November: Mom Life
December: Maintenance

. . .

Week 4: Student Bins & Cubbies

This is the final installment of the January challenge, so if you don't have any student bins or cubbies as a part of your classroom, this is a great week to catch up on any of the pieces and parts from the past weeks.

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